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Gov. DeSantis signs insurance reform bill in Sarasota

DeSantis's office says the bill protects Florida families by restructuring litigation rules for disputed insurance claims.
Credit: AP
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks Tuesday, March 2, 2021, during his State of the State address at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla. (AP Photo/Phil Sears)

SARASOTA SPRINGS, Fla. — Governor Ron DeSantis held a news conference in Sarasota Thursday where he signed SB 76, which involves insurance reform in Florida.

DeSantis's office says the bill protects Florida families by restructuring litigation rules for disputed insurance claims. It also expressly disallows contractors, public adjusters, and companies from using prohibited advertisements that encourage Floridians to make an insurance claim for roof damage; and imposes a fine of up to $10,000 when companies violate the law. 

Earlier this week, DeSantis received 13 bills from the Florida Legislature. The governor has until June 24, 2021, to act on these bills:

  • CS/CS/CS/SB 76 – Insurance
  • SB 794 – Independent Living Services
  • CS/CS/SB 1018 – Largemouth Bass
  • SB 7014 – A Review Under the Open Government Sunset Review Act
  • SB 7022 – A Review Under the Open Government Sunset Review Act
  • CS/HB 311 – Public Records
  • HB 467 – Insurance Adjuster Examination Requirements
  • CS/HB 519 – Required Health Education Instruction
  • HB 827 – School District Funding
  • CS/HB 847 – Florida Postsecondary Academic Library Network
  • CS/CS/CS/HB 1069 – Public Records
  • CS/CS/HB 1349 – Assistance Programs
  • HB 7007 – A Review Under the Open Government Sunset Review Act

DeSantis signed two new state laws aimed to crack down on foreign influence and corporate espionage in Florida on Monday.

State leaders like House Speaker Chris Sprowls, R-Palm Harbor, say Florida is a growing target for foreign agents who are interfering with our research at universities and institutions.

One law requires state agencies, colleges, and universities to disclose all foreign gifts of more than $50,000 and strengthens vetting of foreign applicants for research positions.

The second makes the penalties for anyone who attempts to steal trade secrets more severe.

This is typically an area under the federal government's purview.