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Safety protocols in place for Trump rally, supporters camp in line for hours before event

President Donald Trump will make a campaign stop in Jacksonville on Thursday for a rally at Cecil Airport.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — President Donald Trump will be at Cecil Airport for a rally at 7 p.m. on Sept. 24. Doors will open at 4 p.m., but supporters have been camping out overnight. 

You must register for tickets online, but the event is first-come-first-serve. A group of supporters at the front of the line says they have been camping out since 7 p.m. Wednesday, and they tell First Coast News that others have been camping out for two days.

The campaign was not able to tell us how many people the venue will safely accommodate, but they did say social distancing and masks will be encouraged.

The campaign says masks will be provided.

When you register, you have to accept a COVID-19 waiver. It reads: “By registering for this event, you understand and expressly acknowledge that an inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. In attending the event, you and any guests voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19.”

Chairman of the Republican Party of Duval County Dean Black gave a thumbs up as volunteers made signs ahead of the rally. He says they will exercise their first amendment rights by gathering.

“This is part of who America is. This is an historic occasion and history must not stop for any reason," he said. 

There is a mask mandate still in place in Duval County where Cecil Airport is located, but the spokesperson for the City of Jacksonville Nikki Kimbleton said it will not be enforced at the event because it takes place outside. The mandate only requires masks for the public when they are indoors and cannot social distance. 

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