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Daily surfaces can reach burn-level temperatures during heat wave

Asphalt outside on Wednesday gave a temperature reading of 154 degrees, a high number that could cause burns.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Just how dangerous are those high temperatures?

We used a temperature reading device to check how hot the surfaces you touch every day can get when temperatures rise. 

The temperatures inside a parked car read 116 degrees Fahrenheit, and the steering wheel, which is made up of a leather material, gave a reading of around 156 degrees.

Health experts warn that prolonged exposure to heat could cause medical problems that you can’t see.

“Racing heart, that sweating that we talked about before, headache sometimes people can start to feel a little bit dizzy they may feel nauseous…-- It’s very easy for heat illness to progress quickly from just heat exposure all the way up to something as serious as a heat stroke," Christine Gage, an Emergency medicine administrator fellow, said.

Asphalt outside on Wednesday gave a temperature reading of 154 degrees, a high number that could cause burns.

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The National Institute for Standards and Technology says human skin can sustain first-degree burns at 118, and skin is destroyed when temperatures reach 162 degrees.

High temperatures can also be dangerous for your furry friends. 

Walking dogs in heat over 89.6°F could burn the paws of your pets, according to outdoordogfun.com. The surface of this sand, reading at 128 degrees, can be dangerous.

And leaving pets in a car could be deadly

“Making sure you’re double-checking for those pets or children who may have been forgotten in the back seat. The temperatures in the car climbs very quickly and you can have serious complications from that," Gage said. 

Drinking water is the number one way to stay safe in high temps. When working in the heat, the CDC says to drink eight ounces of water every 15 to 20 minutes.

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