A music video near Jordan Davis' former high school was the site of a potential legal battle Saturday

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Controversy involving the use of Jordan Davis' name and pictures heated up Saturday at a music video shoot on the Southside.

The Davis family attorney John Phillips said the slain teen's image was used to promote an event without the family's consent or knowledge. Phillips said when he asked about T-shirts being sold at the shoot with Jordan Davis' name and face on them, people said donations were being taken, but nothing was sold.

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Phillips says he received an email from Bobby Worthy, the CEO and President of Justice League United asking for the blessing of Jordan's parents on Friday.

According to Phillips, his firm contacted the event promoter listed on the flyer, Donald Daniels.

"Mr. Daniels said he would, he'd hold off, he'd cancel the event, in fact he said it's one of the worst phone calls he's ever had in his life because he has to cancel, and we assumed it was canceled," said Phillips.

The event was not canceled and the video was shot at a car wash in the 6600 block of Powers Ave., just one block from Wolfson High School, Jordan Davis's high school. The director of the video, Mario Wiggins, told FCN he had no knowledge about Phillips trying to cancel the event.

Davis family attorney John Phillips talks to people and vendors on the set of a music video he claims illegally used Jordan Davis' likeness.

First Coast News attempted speaking with the promoted Donald Daniels, but calls were not returned. Worthy responded to Phillips' email stating there is no authorization to use Jordan Davis' images or likeness, Worthy forward his response to First Coast News:

"No one needs your permission or the family to attack injustice! When imagines on the social media that have no kind of register trademark or copyrights can be used."

Under Florida Statute 540.08, it is illegal to "publish, print, display or otherwise publicly use for purposes of trade or for any commercial or advertising, the name, portrait, photograph, or other likeness of any natural person," even deceased person without consent.

"This family is still parenting Jordan Davis and I dare to say anybody whose child is placed on a billboard or is placed on a T-shirt without that parent's permission would want to say hang on, my kid's rights over your desire to sell a t-shirt," added Phillips.

Under state law, there could be punitive damages sought for the unauthorized use of Davis' likeness.

Davis was shot and killed during an argument over loud music by Michael Dunn in November of 2012. Dunn said he shot Davis in self-defense. A jury convicted Dunn of three counts of attempted second-degree murder for the other passengers in the car with Davis, but was unable to reach a verdict on the charge of first-degree murder.

Editors Note: A previous version of this web story said Phillips contacted Bobby Worthy who was the promoter of the event, but Worthy was not the "official" event promoter. The event promoter was Donald Daniels.

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