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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Many of the youth in Jacksonville have been following the murder trial of Michael Dunn. Dunn is accused of shooting and killing 17-year-old Jordan Davis after an alleged dispute over loud music on Black Friday of 2012. The trial has not only impacted the family and friends of the victim and the accused, but also strangers.

About two dozen kids in the city league basketball program take the court at Robert F. Kennedy park in Springfield on the weekends to work on their jump shots, at that moment they're focused on basketball, but some say trials like the ones for Jordan Davis and Trayvon Martin have changed what these young boys worry about.

"I have taken off my hoodie. I usually wear it in the stores, but I've taken it off and I don't really listen to music, as that [Davis and Dunn] situation, I don't really listen to music loud, but I look around. I watch my back while I'm walking down the streets," said David Daniels, 13, as he describes how he's changed his demeanor in public since Davis was shot.

Daniels is the oldest of the group and says at his age he hasn't come across much profiling, but feels like that could change as he gets older.

"Probably around 16 or 15 it probably will start, but not at this age," said Daniels.

It's trials like Davis and Martin's, Derek Bermudez, a father of two young boys and a volunteer for the program, says have changed the black youth.

"It's really sad that these kids get to grow up and see that here I can't even express myself in the land of freedom of expression and in the land of liberty, I'm targeted as a troublemaker," said Bermudez.

Bermudez says although he agrees it is better to walk away, sometimes he says these teens don't have that option.

"I don't think none of the kids had the opportunity to call their dad or to call the police because of the situation they was in. Sometimes when you're right there in the fire what can you do?" added Bermudez.

Bermudez says he's focused on teaching his 9- and 11-year-old boys the importance of having character, integrity, and morals - all lessons Larry Catney, 62, agrees with. Catney says he lives at the senior center around the corner from the park. He says the world was tougher when he was growing up during the civil rights movement, but says even though it's come a long way - it's not perfect yet.

I tell the kids all the time it basically takes two to tango and the strongest man is going to prevail and the strongest man is always going to walk away and take the higher ground

"I tell the kids all the time it basically takes two to tango and the strongest man is going to prevail and the strongest man is always going to walk away and take the higher ground," said Catney.

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