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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- In a sea of baby-faced University of North Florida undergrads, 30-year-old Jack Twachtman stands out like a rogue wave.

It's not his age that sets him apart.

It's his full, flowing beard.

"I do get lots of compliments and comments on it," he said of his two year growth.

He's graduating in two weeks with a degree in marketing.

But it's safe to assume his latest marketing/advertising scheme didn't show up in any of his text books.

He found a way to put his beard to work.

"It sounded really interesting, I can always appreciate innovative ways of getting new ideas out there," he said.

The company Dollar Shave Club started a campaign called Beardvertising, where candidates would wear "beardboards" in their facial hair.

"It goes in your beard like a little beret and then you just wear it around."

The tiny sign says Dollar Shave Club on it, and has an even smaller slogan under that.

You'd have to stare really hard to get a good look, and since everyone stares at Twachtman's beard anyway it works out.

"People come up and talk to me about it, take pictures of it," he said.

Dollar Shave Club is known for its unique and funny advertising techniques.

The company sells memberships for guys to get razors for a monthly fee.

Pretty funny that the firm has employed perhaps the least shaven men in the country to perform this duty.

Twachtman doesn't use it.

"Clearly I do not," he said."I don't think the irony is lost on anyone though."

At a whopping $5 a day for four days of beardvertising, Twachtman isn't getting rich of this.

But with all the attention he and the Dollar Shave Club has received from this, maybe there should be a text book chapter dedicated to beardvertising.

Why not a whole class?

The only prerequisite: The ability to actually grow a full beard.

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