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Philadelphia, PA (Sports Network) - After Chris Bosh rather recklessly claimedlast week he was absolutely a Hall of Famer ("Hell, yeah, of course."), whoelse will be enshrined in one day?

Hall of Fame debates rage in the blood of sports fans.

I've seen beer mugs sail over my head about baseball Hall of Famers'candidacies. I've battled an acquaintance literally into the wee hours of themorning about the candidacy of James Worthy.

One man's or woman's criteria for admittance into immortality varies fromanother's. There's no formula to plug in and say, "Pack your bags forSpringfield."

In honor of Mr. Bosh, let's examine the cases of who will be getting into theHall of Fame upon retirement.

Two rules to remember, one the Hall's and one is mine: First, The NaismithMemorial Basketball Hall of Fame is all-encompassing. College careers matteras does international and Olympic experience.

My rule - this debate will be waged under the guideline that a player, orcoach, or executive will be judged if he walked away from the sport tomorrow.

And one more thing you should know about me - I'm harsh when it comes to Hallof Fame judgment. I have an eye test and if you pass, you're good with me. Idon't dig too deeply into statistical data unless I'm torn.

Also, the worst phrase in sports is "first-ballot Hall of Famer." Either youare a Hall of Famer, or you're not. Numbers don't improve after retirement anddeeming someone unworthy of first-year entrance when their eligibility is metis ludicrous.

So, let the beer mug throwing begin ...

MORTAL LOCKS

If you don't know why these players are guaranteed Hall of Famers, I deem youunworthy of finishing this column.

KOBE BRYANT

TIM DUNCAN

KEVIN GARNETT

STEVE NASH

DIRK NOWITZKI

LEBRON JAMES

JASON KIDD

PAUL PIERCE

RAY ALLEN

GREGG POPOVICH

That is it in my mind for locks. The next group will clarify things better,but these are the only people who would get in no questions asked if theyretired in the morning.

VIRTUAL LOCKS

TONY PARKER

MANU GINOBILI

CARMELO ANTHONY

DWYANE WADE

These guys all have pretty impressive qualifications, but something is justmissing from making them no-doubt-about-it guys. Remember in the case ofGinobili, international play is part of the vote.

TOO YOUNG BUT HEADING TOWARD LOCK STATUS

KEVIN DURANT

CHRIS PAUL

DWIGHT HOWARD

DERRICK ROSE

Hard to argue the first three in my opinion, but consider this with Rose: everyMVP winner has been elected.

NOW THE FUN DEBATES (These all required some statistical information since Iwas torn.)

CHRIS BOSH

Since his comments were the impetus for the column, we'll examine his careerfirst. Bosh's career averages of 19.7 ppg and 9.0 rpg are Hall worthy. Factorin his scoring went down once he joined the Heat and became the third wheel,and it's still strong. Bosh made his eighth All-Star team and counting. Plus,he now has an NBA Championship on the books. But Bosh has made one All-NBAteam, a second-team nod after the 2006-07 campaign, and that was the onlyseason he finished in the top 10 in MVP voting. That was a seventh. Do thoselast two numbers show an indispensable member of the league? I don't think so.Third bananas get into the Hall of Fame, just look at Robert Parish and JamesWorthy, but Bosh needs more. He'll have to make 10 All-Star teams and win afew titles before he gets my vote.

VINCE CARTER

Scorers have a place in the Hall of Fame. Look at Dominique Wilkins. Thequestion is, was Carter a dominant-enough scorer to take his team to adifferent level? Carter never played in an NBA Finals. In his prime, Carteraveraged close to 25 ppg. That's a big number and his career average is stillover 20 ppg despite playing a bench role or playing for lousy teams late inhis career. Carter made eight straight All-Star games, finished in the top 10once for MVP (10th in 1999-2000 season) and made two All-NBA teams, but nevera first. He's just short in my mind.

GRANT HILL

Scoff if you will, but remember, this includes college careers. Hill wasspectacular at Duke, starting all four years, winning two titles and losing inthe championship game his senior season. As a pro, Hill was incredible in hisfirst six years, all healthy ones and all in Detroit. He averaged 21.5 ppg,7.7 rpg (including two years over nine a game), 6.2 apg and 1.6 spg. Those arecrazy numbers. Then the ankle and foot injuries piled up and Hill was neverthe same, although they came close to 20 ppg in a full 2004-05 season for theOrlando Magic. You shouldn't ever consider what his career would have been hadthe injury not occurred, but it's hard not to with Hill. He made the All-Starteam seven times, all deservedly, not some fan voting nonsense, made the All-NBA first or second team five times and finished in the top 10 five straightseasons. Late in his Orlando career and during his Phoenix Suns tenure, Hillwas a respectable player, although nothing near his Pistons days. The collegecareer is enough to sway me. Hill would get my vote.

PAU GASOL

Gasol was the NBA Rookie of the Year in 2001-02. He has made four All-Starteams, three All-NBA teams, picked up two rings, but never factored in an MVPrace. The Spaniard's career averages are 18.4 ppg, 9.2 rpg and 1.7 bpg. That'sstout. Being a decorated European league star and two-time silver medalist inthe Olympics, while outplaying some Americans during those two games is enoughfor my vote.

AMARE STOUDEMIRE

Knew it would happen and Stoudemire was the guy whose career I undervalued.Stoudemire has made six All-Star teams, five All-NBA teams (either first orsecond) and finished in the top 10 four times in MVP voting. That is a reallystrong resume for a guy who has been dinged up quite a bit on top of puttingup 21.4 ppg and 8.7 rpg. Still a no from me, but those numbers caused pause.

DOUG COLLINS

Absolutely one of the most interesting cases of looking at whole picture,Collins doesn't have a single distinguishable aspect of his career thatwarrants induction. He was a good college player at Illinois State, goodenough to be the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft in the 1973. Collins was anOlympian and hit the two free throws that led to the controversial finish ofthe 1972 gold medal game against the Russians. Collins made four All-Starteams in the NBA and his coaching career has been solid, if not borderlinegreat. After leading the Bulls to the Eastern Conference Finals, he took overthe Pistons, Washington Wizards and Philadelphia 76ers. In his first season atthose three stops, the win totals went up 18, 18 and 14 from the season before.That's massive improvement. Plus, Collins is one of, if not the bestbroadcasters of the last 20 years. So, if you look at each piece individually,Collins isn't close. If you add them all up, he's an interesting candidate tome. Still, a no however.

And we have one last category.

THANKS FOR A GREAT CAREER, BUT YOU'RE NOT GETTING IN

CHAUNCEY BILLUPS

His later runs with the Pistons and Denver Nuggets gets him closerand his reputation as a leader and big-game player are commendable. However,Billups didn't do enough over the entirety of his career.

SHAWN MARION

Four All-Star games, two All-NBA teams and over 16,000 pointsmake you think a little harder about him.

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