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CBS has unveiled its game plan for covering the Feb. 3 Super Bowlaction, and also disclosed that it's practically out of commercial timefor the Big Game.

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"Weare sold out," CBS Corp. CEO Leslie Moonves said during a CBS mediaevent on Tuesday. But he did leave a bit of wiggle room for last-minuteadvertisers who wanted to buy time in the game, saying that the networkstill had the ability to meet late sales requests.

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He also said that some 30-second ad units sold for more than $4 million each.

"These numbers are the highest ever paid for Super Bowl spots," Moonves said.

BigGame advertisers include car makers, soft-drink producers, fast-foodcompanies and sportswear firms. Pepsi, Toyota, Anheuser-Busch ,GoDaddy, Lincoln, and Skechers are among the many in the game.

Moonvessaid local TV ad sales were robust as well. In the New York market --where both the Jets and the Giants didn't even make it to the playoffs-- some 30-second ad slots on WCBS sold for more than $1 million each.

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Moonves pointed out the large, engaged Super Bowl audience, and said that for many, Super Sunday is a national holiday.

It's "truly extraordinary" what this event means to America, he said.

Forits Super Bowl XLVII coverage, the network is pulling togetherresources from its sports, news and entertainment divisions.Programming -- which will begin the week before the Big Game -- will notonly focus on the actual Super Bowl, but also on the cuisine,architecture and culture of the game's host city New Orleans.

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Contentwill run on platforms such as broadcast TV, cable TV, radio anddigital. The halftime show will be shown on TV as well as streamedlive.

At Tuesday's media presentation, CBS media executives andsports announcers kept the atmosphere light, frequently joking aroundand poking fun of one another.

At one point during the event, the name of this year's Super Bowl's halftime performer -- Beyoncé Knowles -- came up.

Moonveswas quick to jump in with his own joshing commentary: "I actuallywanted Janet Jackson," he said, referring back to Jackson'scontroversial halftime show of 2004 when she had an infamousbreast-baring "wardrobe malfunction."

CBS aired the Super Bowlthat year, and took some heat for the mishap. The Supreme Court foundthe Federal Communications Commission erred in trying to penalize thenetwork and ordered the $550,000 fine refunded in full.

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